Friday, 17 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part fifteen


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Making realistic tarpaulins from tissue. The inspiration for this particular post came from a magazine article by Brian Balkwell and published in Model Military International - November 2006. Brian suggested using standard tissues coated with water based silicone sealant to make realistic model tarps in 1:35th scale. I tried this using acrylic medium (used by artists to extend acrylic paints) but found that the tissue paper disintegrated. Back to the drawing board.....

I then stumbled upon some computer screen cleaning cloths. The small tissues are about the same size as a standard tissue but made from a thicker paper/tissue. I painted each side of the cloth with the acrylic medium and found that it was much better and able to be manipulated (see the last image).

 

I then painted the tarpaulin with green acrylic paint. The model Tarp was then scrunched up and folds were added and taken away until I had a flexible tarpaulin. I cut the tarpaulin to a scale 10' x 8' and folded over the edges, about 1 - 1.5mm each side (as suggested by Brian). This was then pressed over a simple resin box to which I had added a couple of balsawood strips. I did not paint the box as the tarpaulin would be covering the whole model. I used superglue to keep the tarpaulin in place and pressed the model and tarp down onto a piece of toughened glass and left it until the glue had fully set.

When I was happy with the effect, I drybrushed the surface with lighter green acrylic paint and even added a couple of washes to highlight the folds (both effects were discussed in the original MMI article). For additional detailing I have added a plastic spanner from the Italeri Field Workshop Set and eyelets made by pressing a small hole in the tarpaulin and then using a silver pencil to model the metal ring.


I am sure that I will be using similar techniques to make more tarpaulins on future projects.

Tony

Thursday, 16 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part fourteen


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Another load of bits for the layout. Starting on the left, a small pot made from the Italeri Field Kit, then a sheet of metal modelled from a piece of plastic card both have been painted in a weathered and rusted metal colour using a Vallejo Charred Brown and Hot Orange mix applied with an old and rather decrepit brush. The wooden packing case is a modified Reaper Bones box/crate with a Milliput sack added to the top at the side is another oil can made from a pen top. The handle is made from more aluminium strip, this time painted green with a simple paper label glued to the side. On the right we have a galvanised metal water tank which is scratch-built from plastic card. It was inspired by a similar water tank that I saw and sketched while visiting Avoncroft Museum in Bromsgrove earlier in the year. The sides were distorted after heating the model over a gas cooking ring then pressing the plastc with a bamboo skewer. It was painted with acrylic colours and matt varnished. The rusted wheel set is from a Peco kit while the larger metal beam to the front is a section of Plaststruct H section, it and the plastic tube (found in the bits box) are painted with the Charred Brown and Hot Orange mix as detailed above. I have then used some Humbrol Rust weathering powder (AV0008) on the rusted items. This is lightly brushed on with a fan-shaped brush that I keep just for this purpose.

Tony

Wednesday, 15 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part thirteen


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Many of these scratch-built models were built while sitting in the shed and listening to the World Cup on the radio. I found that these simple and easily made pieces of clutter were the perfect accompaniment to the many hours of radio coverage and the hot dry weather. Today's post is a water carrier which was inspired by one I had seen on The Severn Valley Railway. It was built from a section of plastic tubing, wheels from a 1:43.5 scale tractor model and bits from the spares box. The handles were made from some spare aluminium sheeting which was curved around a paint pot and glued in place with superglue.


Painting was done with acrylic paints and dark washes. I varnished the whole model with a mix of Matt and Gloss varnishes while the weathering was done with a graphite pencil rubbed around the edges and some watercolour pencils.

Tony

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twelve


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Today's post is a real mix and match of items from various sources. The oil drum is from the Italeri Field Workshop kit No. 04195 that I picked up from e-bay. It was painted with acrylic paints. The rusted oil container was 'turned' on my Black and Decker hand drill from a section of knitting needle and detailed with various pieces of plastic card and plastic rod. It was also painted with acrylic paints. The iron beam was modelled from a balloon stick, the plastic stick that is given away free when balloons are given to children and cost me nothing I modified the X section to be a T section and cut it to length. Similar Plastistruct profiles can cost over £2.00 a length so looking out for suitable plastic profiles is well worth it. The final item is a watering can which was 'scratch-built' from a section of pen barrel, some plastic card and plastic rod and pieces of sheet aluminium. It was painted in metallic greys to represent a galvanised watering can and when varnished, I used a graphite pencil to add some metallic sheen to the edges.

Tony

Monday, 13 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part eleven


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


This warehouse trolley was scratch-built from various thicknesses of plastic card following a design I saw on the TV programme Salvage Hunters. The trolley was used in a fabric manufacturers/dyers and as I sat watching, I quickly sketched details on a scrap of paper. The only addition or change from the original were the four lifting lugs, one on each corner. The wheels were sections of knitting needles cut into discs and sanded smooth. The metal strapping was more (thinner) plastic card.

Painting was built up over a dark brown basecoat with lighter highlights brush painted with acrylic paints. The plank effect was done by applying washes over the textured plastic card sides while the metalwork was painted in a dark brown/black colour with a fine brush.

The model was varnished with Galleria Matt Varnish before I applied metal highlights with a graphite pencil.


Tony

Sunday, 12 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part ten


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


This time two resin oil drums - the European style oil drums with heavy central rolling bands. The models are resin casts of originals sculpted by me, for details see this post. Both have been aged or dented by attacking with a Dremel burr prior to painting. The rear drum has a Milliput two part epoxy sack added to the top. This was made from some spare Milliput I had left over after working on another project, I find that 'spare' Milliput can always be modelled into something like a sack or a canvas bag rather than thrown away.

Painting was done with acrylic paints and washes. Both were varnished with Galleria Matt Varnish before I used a graphite pencil to add a metallic sheen to the edges. The small oil stain was done with black and dark brown acrylic paint added to KLEAR floor polish.

Tony

Saturday, 11 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part nine


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Here you can see one of the largest pieces of clutter I have made for the narrow gauge layout, a steel oil tank. The model was based on an oil storage container that I had seen in Upton-on-Severn in Worcestershire it is built from plastic card around some LEGO bricks with detail from more plastic card, plastic rod and a couple of cut-down pen tops used as vents. The brick base was constructed from green foam, the brick pattern inscribed on with a scalpel and the point of a sharp pencil. It was painted with acrylic paints with much weathering. I chose to paint it red rather than the more usual green.

To the side you can see a large resin barrel that was sculpted by me (details can be found in earlier posts). The metal wheel was from a 1:43.5 scale tractor that was picked up in a local charity shop while the pipe is a section of pen barrel.

Tony

Wednesday, 8 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part eight


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


This latest update shows some more additions. Firsts, we have scaffolding poles; cut from 1.5mm plastic rod with the ends drilled out. I chose 10 foot long poles, but I am aware that these poles came in different lengths. They are painted in various rust/metallic colours and matt varnished.

The large metal pipe is a section of spare pen barrel which has also been painted in rust colours and matt varnished.

The additional pieces of clutter are; a wooden barrel (actually one of the cast resin barrels that I sculpted and have spoken about in earlier posts). Then there is a another enamel container (another item sculpted by me and available as a resin cast) it was painted white and gloss varnished. The small pot is a modified pen top with a florist wire  handle while the re-railing ramp was made from plastic card and follows a design I found on the Internet.

Details of the wooden barrel and enamel pot can be found here.

Tony

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part seven


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


More Boxes and Oil Drums. In both images the oil drums are 1:50th scale resin castings which were bought from E-bay. They were intended as wagon loads for 1:50th scale Corgi die-cast lorries and were ideal as smaller oil containers in the 1:27.7 scale. They were first washed with soap and water and then sprayed with Humbrol MAKES PAINT STICK as the resin was a little oily.

In the first image you can also see a scratch built wooden toolbox, which was made from layers of 3mm thick plastic card and detailed with thinner plastic card before being painted with acrylics and washed.

The second image shows more 1:50th scale oil drums and three resin boxes from Reaper (Bones) which are intended for 1:56th wargame figures. Once again painted with acrylics and washed before being varnished with Galleria Matt Varnish. The label was cut from the Waitrose wines and spirits guide, mentioned in an earlier post.


The oil drums were painted with an old and rather dilapidated brush and some make-up sponges with the acrylic paint applied in layers and with a stippling action. I have found that this gives an effect close to airbrushing and is much easier to blend than using a brush alone. The oil pump was constructed from various sections of plastic tubing and a piece of electrical wire. The SHELL logo came from a decal set I picked up at a car-boot sale some time ago and was applied over KLEAR (Future in the US) before being matt varnished. The oil stains on the top of the oil drums was done by adding dark brown and black acrylic paint to Klear and applying small drops to the top. In some instances I add another layer of Klear to get a better wet gloss effect.

Tony

Tuesday, 7 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part six


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


I would hope that you would find these two updates interesting. In the first image you can see a selection of bits that are in the main modelled from the workings of a transistor radio (the same second-hand radio that I used the speaker from, to mount in the brick base of the OSO Salt metal pan. See earlier posts for more details) and some items from my 'spares box'. With the exception of the metal wheel sets (picked up at The Severn Valley Railway for just £1.00) and the large pipe (a pen barrel) all of the other items are from the radio. I have used an old brush in a scrubbing motion and Vallejo Game Color Charred Brown and Hot Orange to apply the rust colour. Once dry I have washed the rust with a dark flesh wash and varnished the pieces with Galleria Matt Varnish.

In the image below, the pieces are also from the transistor radio with the larger flat section being the backing to the radio station finder, the angled piece from behind the battery compartment and the screw jack made from the screw mounting inside the main body of the radio. Once again I have used the Vallejo Color paints to add the rust colour, although I have used some Humbrol Rust coloured weathering powder on the larger flat piece at the front. This was applied over the top of the Galleria varnish with a large fan-headed brush that I keep for this purpose.


Tony

Sunday, 5 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part five


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


The last lot of Schweppes boxes have been finished. These four were a little bit different to the earlier boxes as two were modelled as open boxes while the remaining two are intended to be placed on their side rather than standing upright. They have been painted in the same way as the earlier models, acrylic paint highlighted by drybrushing and finished with washes.

The square oil container was modelled from layers of 3mm thick plastic card with the cone top sanded to shape and a plastic rod screw top superglued in place before being painted red. The label on the front was cut from the Waitrose wine and spirit guide - a great resource for small labels and posters and free.

This final image shows all 14 Schweppes wooden boxes. My intention is to have them placed on the layout as clutter, stacked up against the wooden fence or along the brick wall. They have been great fun to build and to paint while listening to The World Cup football matches on the radio and enjoying the warm weather in the garden shed.


Tony

Saturday, 4 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part four


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Moving away from wooden boxes and oil drums, in this latest post I am showing some wooden planks and a couple of small oil cans.

Firstly, the planks. I Googled UK scaffolding planks and scaled them down to 1:27.7 before cutting them from some 1.5mm thick scrap wood (wood used as packing cases for fruit or vegetables). I added some subtle graining by rubbing with sandpaper before adding the metal strips to each end. The metal strips were cut from a metal/aluminium food container (the sort that you get your Chinese take-away in). The metal strips were glued in place with superglue and then painted - actually dyed. I used a very weak dirty wash to add some aged colour to the wooden planks before masking the ends to add the colour-coded end strips and paint spills. I think they look great and will make more.

Secondly, the oil cans. The smaller can was turned on my Black & Decker electric hand drill from a plastic rod I had in my 'spares box'. The detailing is a simple dress makers pin for the plunger and a strip of aluminium tray bent up as the handle. It is painted dark green/blue with gloss black oil runs. The second oil can, more of an oil kettle was made from the top of a pen (the plunger) with plastic card detailing and more aluminium strips as the banding and a bent florists wire handle. It was painted in a well worn rust colour mixed from Vallejo Game Color Charred Brown and Hot Orange. The paint was stippled on with an old brush before being washed with a flesh wash from Games Workshop.

Tony

Friday, 3 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part three


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


Another day, another update. A couple more Schweppes wooden boxes painted in a slightly fresher wood colour, a wooden packing case which is a plastic model from Reaper Bones and originally intended for 1/56th wargame figures which was painted in the same colour. Then an oil can modelled from a section of knitting needle, some plastic rod and a piece of metal foil for the handle painted blue and varnished with gloss varnish. Finally, a resin oil drum that was sculpted by me and then cast in resin by Hysterical Games. I painted it grey with a darker wash before varnishing.

Details of the resin oil drum and how it was made can be found here.

Tony

Thursday, 2 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part two


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.


In part two you can see some more Schweppes boxes, a resin barrel and a petrol or oil can. The boxes were scratch-built as detailed in the earlier post and painted in the same way but with a slightly different colour palette of darker brown and an orange brown before being washed with a dark flesh wash and matt varnished. The wooden barrel was a resin casting from my spares box and originally intended to go with some 40mm metal figures. I painted it in a slightly darker black/brown colour with dark metal banding which was accentuated with a graphite pencil to add a metallic shine after varnishing. The petrol can was scratch built from a knitting needle which was turned in the chuck of an electric hand drill. I used a variety of different tools to carve the shape before polished the plastic with some fine abrasive paper. Detailing was added from sticky-pack labels and plastic card/rod. It was painted with acrylic red paint and washed with a dark brown/black wash before being varnished. I have used the graphite pencil to once again add a metallic sheen to the egdes.

Tony

Wednesday, 1 August 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part one


Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.


In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.



The first of this series of Blog posts relates to the wooden boxes. The as yet un-named layout will portray a chemical works alongside a canal and I wanted to add some boxes as clutter. I looked at Shell Motor Oil container boxes, but in the end decided to copy Schweppes soda syphon boxes (as can be seen in the last image).

The boxes were made in bulk from a couple of strips of thick plastic card (the sort of plastic that advertising signs are made from) then cut into small box shapes 13.3mm wide x 9mm deep and 12.9mm high. The surface detailing was done with sandpaper and scoring with a scalpel. The hand holes and locking hole was drilled-out with a Dremel and a pinvice while the wooden supports and lid were more plastic card glued in place with superglue.


In this third image you can see the sketches and a completed box. The image is taken from my project book which is crammed full of sketches, plans and images. I will post more on this in a later update.


Painting was done in batches. The first five being basecoated in dark brown before being drybrushed in a dark brown/Ochre mix and then washed in a dark flesh wash. Detailing was picked out in black with a silver highlight and the OSO logo was added with Letraset white letters.

I will give details of the oil barrel in a later post.

Tony

Tuesday, 31 July 2018

More Wargame Terrain Book - limited copies left



Following a number of recent orders. I can confirm that there are now only 5 copies of Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 2 - More Wargame Terrain left. If you are interested in purchasing a copy of this self-published, limited edition book at the reduced price of just £12.50 (plus post and packaging) see this link.

Please note Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 3 - Models For Wargamers is also available at the reduced price of £12.50 (plus post and packaging). For details see this link or use the Models For Wargamers tab to the right.

Thank you.

Tony

Sunday, 29 July 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter



Resin castings of some scratch built items of 'clutter' sculpted by me. 
for more information see this post.

In a recent magazine article I read the following. "Clutter can add interest but you must not overdo it." In these posts I hope to disprove the statement and push the boundaries on just how much clutter is too much.

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.

In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.

Tony

Monday, 23 July 2018

Models For Wargamers REDUCED - update



Following on from this earlier post and after reading some comments on The Miniatures Page I have added some images of both books to the Blog. To order your own copy/copies please see this link for Models For Wargamers or this link for More Wargame Terrain.

Image two - The contents page of Models For Wargamers


Image three - The Squidship Lilith


Image four - The Tealight Signal Tower W-I-P


Image five - The Damaged Tower House W-I-P


Image six - The back page


Image seven - The cover of More Wargame Terrain


Image eight - The contents page


Image Nine - The Donkey Worked Winding Well


Image ten - The Olde Barn W-I-P


Image eleven - The back page


Should you want to order a copy of either limited edition book please see the links to the right or follow these links; Models For Wargamers or More Wargame Terrain both of which have been reduced to just £12.50 (plus post and packaging). Please Note - there are limited stocks of both.

Thank you.

Tony

Monday, 16 July 2018

Models For Wargamers REDUCED



Earlier this week it was pointed out to me that Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 1 - Building Wargame Terrain was first published over five years ago and Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No.2 - More Wargame Terrain over four years ago. How time flies.....

Please note; There are no copies of Building Wargame Terrain left.

To commemorate the anniversary I have reduced the price of Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 3 - Models For Wargamers to just £12.50 (was £18.00) and brought the postage cost down to match the earlier book.

In addition I have reduced the cost of Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 2 - More Wargame Terrain to £12.50 (was £15.00). Please be aware that there are limited numbers of both books available.

To order Models For Wargamers please use this link and to order More Wargame Terrain please use this link.

Thank you.

Tony

Saturday, 14 July 2018

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - the layout part thirty-seven



Work on the layout has been slow, I have managed to build some items of clutter (more on this later in the month and for the whole month of August) but with the hot weather and baby-sitting most of my modelling and/or painting has been done in short sessions while listening to The World Cup on the radio. 

This latest post shows the brick wall section that will fit between the main end-on building and the OSO Salt salt pan. In the image above you get a sense of the height and detailing of the bricks. I wanted a worn and run-down look and decided that I just couldn't face placing individual bricks as modelled with the base of the salt pan. The wall section is modelled from 'pizza foam' - the foam that you find on the bases of frozen pizzas.

In the second image you can see the full section. The wall was modelled slightly longer than needed as I thought it was easier to trim it down rather than build it to fit exactly. The wall is 180mm long x 60mm tall and just 10mm thick.


It was built on a corrugated cardboard core with pizza foam on the top and front. The individual bricks were impressed into the foam with the same brick making tool used for the earlier end-on building (see earlier posts).

Painting was done with a basecoat of cream/white and a number of layers of drybrushing over the top. Highlighting was done with washes and artists watercolour pencils. The SHELL sign was sourced from the internet and printed onto photographic paper at the local Boots the Chemists. It was stuck to thin card and weathered with acrylic paints and pencils before being glued in place. Once dry, I varnished the whole wall with Galleria matt varnish.


These two images show the pizza foam and corrugated cardboard construction.


While this final image shows work-in-progress.


Tony

Wednesday, 11 July 2018

Chateau Impney Hill Climb 2018 - part two



Part two and some of the weird and wonderful cars that were taking part in the hill climb.
















Tony